Evening Workshops

General information

On Monday 29th, Tuesday 30th and Wednesday 31th of August we offer 6 different, highly educational Evening Workshops. Limited seats are available. So book your FREE Evening Workshop(s)  a.s.a.p. via the registration tool!

Evening Workshop Registration

There is a maximum of 100 persons for each Evening Workshop.
Registration for the IMSC 2022 Conference is obligatory in order to be able to register for the Side Event.

The registration for the Evening Workshops will close on 1st of August 2022.

Participation to the Evening Workshops are free of charge!

Please click the button below to start your (free) registration.

IMSC 2022 Evening Workshops

FEMS Workshop

Monday 29 August 2022

18:00 - 20:00 hrs

Lecturers:

IMSF Focus Group Instrumentation
The R&D journey from idea to market

Monday 29 August 2022

18:00 - 20:00 hrs

Lecturers: Christopher Anderton and Shane Ellis

IMSF Focus Group native MS
Native Mass Spectrometry and Allied Methods for Biology, Chemistry and Medicine – Major Challenges and Key Opportunities

Monday 29 August 2022

18:00 - 20:00 hrs

Lecturers: Joseph Gault, Aneika Leney, Antonio Calabrese, Michal Sharon and Frank Sobott

What does it take to bring a MS technology to the market? In this workshop we will hear from industry leaders about their experiences in developing new MS technologies, challenges they faced, technical problems they solved, and generally what are the key factors it takes to bring instrument technology to the market. From a combination of presentations and open discussions, panelist will touch on their prior experience with developing new technologies, bottlenecks that they faced in R&D, the history of a product’s development, outline skills needed for R&D scientists in their company, and/or any other story or thoughts they have on related to their experience of bringing a cutting-edge piece of MS technology to the market. As much of the R&D work occurs behind closed doors, a key hope of this workshop is to give MS scientists with an interest in technology development insight into the exciting work that goes on in company R&D departments. It will provide young scientists an opportunity to engage with industry R&D leaders and understand what skills they may be looking for in future employees. A key aim of this workshop is to provide a greater understanding of the key factors that will enable a technology generated in an academic setting to eventually the market. Christopher Anderton (PNNL, US) and Shane Ellis (University of Wollongong, Aus), Early Stage Researchers t.b.a. (if you are interested to work with Chris and Shane please contact martina.marchetti-deschmann(a)tuwien.ac.at)
This course is designed for the attendee who wants to understand more about the fundamental, instrumental, and practical aspects of tandem mass spectrometry. Attendees will be new users of MS/MS who have some basic knowledge of mass spectrometry (i.e. familiar with ESI and MALDI, and understand the basic principles of at least one type of mass analyzer). In more detail, the participants will obtain an detailed insight into e.g. fragmentation pathways, collision energy, collision gases, different MS/MS instruments.

IMSF Focus Group Imaging MS
Taking Mass Spectrometry Imaging one step further

Tuesday 30 August 2022

18:00 - 20:00 hrs

 

IMSF Focus Group Forensics
Driving Forensic Mass Spectrometry innovation to implementation in the 21st century

Tuesday 30 August 2022

18:00 - 20:00 hrs

IMSF Career Workshop

Wednesday 31 August 2022

18:00 - 20:00 hrs

Lecturers:

Mass spectrometry imaging has rapidly matured into a valuable analytical method for various fields, including material sciences, biology, toxicology, clinical research. Yet, despite gaining popularity, [IL1] its full potential remains to be unlocked. During this workshop, we would like to provide an interactive platform to discuss ways to move forward with our technique, to push boundaries to take it one step further to solving disease or biological problems. In this workshop, we would like to cover several topics, and attempt to address the following points: How can we improve the robustness of our sample preparation techniques, and continually the move towards single cell investigations? How can we improve standardization and reporting for robust and reproducible method transfer between groups? How can we reliably identify analytes of interest, and integrate in an automated and comprehensive manner MS^n to our imaging experiment? What potential do we currently have to explore post-translational modifications from MSI data? What are the strategies that can be added to separate isobars and isomers from our (chromatographic-free) approach? Where required, how can we increase the versality for the detected analytes (e.g. using reactive chemistry, coupling with separation sciences, etc.)? And therefore, from this point onwards, how can we build meaningful molecular networks from imaging data? We encourage everyone with an interest for MSI, from new to the field, early career researchers, to experts, to join the discussion and brainstorm these gaps and on how we do take our technique one step further. We are looking forward to discussing these points with you! Martina Marchetti-Deschmann (A, TU Wien), Peggi Angel (US, MUSC College of Medicine), Ingela Lanekoff (S, Uppsala University), Tiffany Porta-Siegel (D, Boehringer Ingelheim) together with early-stage researchers Stefania Maneta Stavrakaki (UK, Imperial College), Samuele Zoratto (TU Wien), Leonidas Mavroudakis (S, Uppsala University)
This workshop will take you on a brief journey widening our understanding of the word "forensic" and extending it to those mass spectrometry approaches that gather intelligence to safeguard society in a much broader way (three brief presentations). Within this session, we will also brainstorm on the enablers and roadblockers around successful implementation of intelligence gathering innovation in operational settings (group work) Simona Francese (UK, Sheffield Hallam University) together with early stage researchers: Ravit Yacobi (IL, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem), Shirin Alex (NL, NFI/TUDelft) and Antonia Malissa (A, TU Wien)
Clinical proteomics experiments are aimed at uncovering differences in proteins or phosphosites between clinical groups. These groups can include clinically and/or molecularly distinct disease subtypes, differences in response to treatment or differences in prognosis. In order to detect these differential proteins or phosphosites, experimental bias between groups needs to be minimized. Especially, in label-free experiments where the comparison is many vs. many and each sample needs to me measured individually, proper experimental design is important since samples are not pooled prior to data acquisition. Complete (block) randomization or alternation of samples across groups in addition to QA/QC samples is advised for large-scale clinical proteomics experiments to minimize bias and ensure high data quality. Different experiment strategies will be discussed.